Trans Canada Trail

  • Baie St-Paul, Charlevoix, Québec

    Photo: Robert Chiasson

  • Whiteshell, Caddy Lake, Manitoba

    Photo: Cedric and Magee

  • Trail in Québec

    Photo: Laval Poulin

  • Maukinak Trail, Ontario

    Photo: Hap Wilson

  • Sentier des Caps, Québec

    Photo: Laval Poulin

  • Pinawa Trail, Manitoba

    Photo: Trans-Canada Trail

  • Stanley Park, British Columbia

    Photo: Keith Levit

  • Sentier des Caps, Québec

    Photo: Laval Poulin

BY THE NUMBERS

The trail is currently 21,500 km in length with 2,200 km to be built, connecting more than 15,000 communities in Canada

Four out of five Canadians will be living within 30 minutes of the trail once completed

26% of The Great Trail is on water

Trans Canada Trail: connecting The Great Trail in 2017

A 24,000-km Route that Showcases Canada’s Natural Diversity

In a country as large as Canada, connections matter… the national railroad of the 19th Century, the Trans-Canada Highway system of the 20th Century and now The Great Trail of the 21st Century. Trans Canada Trail (TCT) – the not-for-profit organization – launched the development of The Great Trail in 1992, as part of Canada 125 celebrations. The goal is now to fully connect the Trail across Canada in 2017, to mark the 150th anniversary of Canada’s founding.

TCT is represented by provincial and territorial organizations in every region. These organizations work at the provincial, territorial, regional and local levels to ensure the Trail is planned and built according to the needs and desires of local communities. In 2016, TCT awarded more than $15 million to local trail-building organizations and municipalities across Canada. To date, more than 21,500 kilometers of the Trail are operational – 91 per cent of the proposed route, with just more than 2,200 kilometers yet to be connected. 

Canadians’ Gift to Canadians

Over the years, countless thousands of Canadians have played a role in making the trail a reality. It unfolds through urban, rural and wilderness settings and is used by millions of Canadians as they hike, cycle, paddle, horseback ride and cross country ski in view of Canada’s ever-changing natural diversity.

With the focus on trail connection, local groups are hard at work planning routes, negotiating land access, securing permits and raising funds. All levels of government are supporting TCT; for example, the Federal Government donates 50 cents for every dollar donated by the private sector and individual donors.

“For the past 25 years, TCT has been working with donors, our partners, governments, landowners and volunteers to create a living symbol of national collaboration,” says TCT President & CEO Deborah Apps. “The Canada-wide connection of The Great Trail in 2017 is a bold dream made possible into a reality by donors like Power Corporation, who believe in creating a meaningful legacy for future generations, and The Great Trail is that legacy.”

The Great Trail is not merely a lateral, coast-to-coast undertaking, it also flows northward to the Arctic coast to connect communities in some of the most remote regions of the country. When connected, the Trail will be within 30 minutes of more than 80 per cent of Canadians, and 15,000 communities.

“The Great Trail typifies the Canadian aspiration towards connectedness, a theme that brought Canada together almost a century and a half ago, and one which still defines us as a nation,” says Gary Doer, a Director of Power Corporation and a Patron of the TCT. “It is a collective project that captures the imagination of Canadians and unites us as a community defined by our heritage, our pride in Canada and what it stands for.”

The Great Trail typifies the Canadian aspiration towards connectedness, a theme that brought Canada together almost a century and a half ago, and one which still defines us as a nation.
Gary Doer
Director of
Power Corporation and a
Patron of the TCT

Video

See videos from Trans Canada Trail.