Canadian Museum for Human Rights

  • The unique architecture of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Photo: CMHRP

  • The Canadian Museum for Human Rights opening ceremonies, held on September 19, 2014.

    Photo: CMHRP

  • The Human Rights Timeline greets visitors as they enter the first gallery, What Are Human Rights?

    Photo: CMHRP

  • Canadian Journeys, the largest gallery in the Museum, explores the steps and missteps on the road to greater human rights in Canada.

    Photo: CMHRP

  • 800 meters of glowing alabaster-clad ramps connect the galleries of the Museum, allowing visitors to walk on a path of light through darkness.

    Photo: CMHRP

  • The Israel Asper Tower of Hope offers breathtaking views of Winnipeg and completes the journey from darkness to light.

    Photo: CMHRP

BY THE NUMBERS

Since opening its doors in 2014, the Museum has welcomed over a million visitors in person, and many more online

The Museum is built on the ideas and guidance of nearly 4,000 Canadians, who contributed to our development

The Museum is a cultural phenomenon, winning 38 awards on the national and international stage

Opening a New Era in Human Rights

Tens of thousands of Canadians, supporters and donors from around the world dedicated themselves to the project of building a place where visitors could take an honest look at the journey to greater human rights for all, including the steps and missteps along the way. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is the result of their efforts.

Inspired by visionary leaders like Israel (Izzy) Asper, the Museum is proud to be the first national museum built outside the Ottawa region. Established in 2008 as a Crown corporation under the Museums Act, the Museum continues to enjoy strong support from the private sector, including substantial contributions from Power Corporation and its subsidiaries, Great-West Lifeco and IGM Financial.

Learning More about Human Rights and the Importance to Protect Them

At the Museum, human right stories are told in unique and remarkable ways. Through films, interactive digital displays, artifacts and works of art, the Museum inspires visitors with the stories of human rights champions taking action for their rights and the rights of others.  

The dedication of the Museum’s community has led to dozens of national and international awards for our galleries, educational programs, architecture, accessibility and inclusive design. In 2018, only four years after opening, the Museum was chosen by the Bank of Canada as a featured image on the new $10 bill, alongside civil rights trailblazer Viola Desmond.

“The support of Power Corporation has been essential to our mission and allows us to offer the inspiring experiences that draw thousands to the Museum every day. With their support, we’ve become a national and international hub of human rights education,” said Mena Gainpaulsingh, CEO of the Friends of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

“Living as we do in an advanced and modern country like Canada, it is all too easy for us to take our human rights for granted,” said Paul Desmarais, Jr., Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer of Power Corporation.

“The Canadian Museum for Human Rights now stands as a permanent and constant reminder that human rights are integral to our worth as individuals and must be guarded and nurtured for all citizens,” added André Desmarais, Deputy Chairman, President and Co-Chief Executive Officer.

The support of Power Corporation has been essential to our mission and allows us to offer the inspiring experiences that draw thousands to the Museum every day. With their support, we’ve become a national and international hub of human rights education.
Mena Gainpaulsingh
CEO of the Friends of the CMHR

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